Extra 10% off with purchase $99+. Code:
FAST & FREE SHIPPING ON ORDERS +$19.99*
Shopping Cart
Total:
 
$0.00
  • Home
  • The Young Entrepreneur's Guide to Starting and Running a Business: Turn Your Ideas into Money!
The Young Entrepreneur's Guide to Starting and Running a Business: Turn Your Ideas into Money!
The Young Entrepreneur's Guide to Starting and Running a Business: Turn Your Ideas into Money!
NEW

The Young Entrepreneur's Guide to Starting and Running a Business: Turn Your Ideas into Money!

$27.00 $15.89
  • SKU: 0385348541
  • Availability: in stock Many in stock Out of stock You can purchase this product but it's out of stock
  • Vendor: Amazon
  • Product Type: Paperback Books
  • Barcode: 9780385348546
BUY NOW
  • Description
  • Reviews
Description

Author: Mariotti, Steve

Brand: Crown Business

Edition: Revised, Updated ed.

Features:

  • Crown Business

Binding: Paperback

Number Of Pages: 496

Release Date: 29-04-2014

Details: Product Description It doesn't matter how old you are or where you're from; you can start a profitable business. The Young Entrepreneur's Guide to Starting and Running a Business will show you how. Through stories of young entrepreneurs who have started businesses, this book illustrates how to turn hobbies, skills, and interests into profit-making ventures. Mariotti describes the characteristics of the successful entrepreneur and covers the nuts and bolts of getting a business up, running and successful. Review "For the real goods, go straight to Mariotti's book." -- Inc. magazine "The Young Entrepreneur's Guide is the bible of self-help. It not only tells the story of many young people who have made the journey to success and self-respect, but shows step-by-step how you can do the same." --Jack Kemp About the Author Steve Mariotti is the founder of the National Foundation for Teaching Entrepreneurship (NFTE), a non-profit organization that has taught over twenty-five thousand young people across the country how to start their own small businesses. Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved. The Difference Between an Entrepreneur and an Employee Many people dream of owning their own business, being their own boss, and enjoying the reward of unlimited earnings. Entrepreneurship is the American dream. But most people hesitate to take the plunge. Like them, you may worry that you don't have enough money, time, or experience to start and operate your own small business. Michelle insists that there is always time to start your own business, even if you're a single mother and a full-time college student. Michelle should know; at age nineteen, she started her own business while attending college and caring for her daughters -- Angela, three years old, and Erica, age eighteen months -- and her newborn son, Kristian. Before she started her clothing resale company, À La Mode, Michelle knew nothing about running a business and had very little money. When I met Michelle, I thought she had tremendous natural elegance and poise, but it was clear that she was living a difficult life as a single mother of three children. Today, she's a successful entrepreneur. Like Michelle, most Americans earn money by working in business. Business is the buying and selling of products and services in order to make money. Someone who earns a living by working for someone else's business is an employee of that business. There are many different kinds of employees. At Ford Motor Company, for instance, some employees build the vehicles, some sell them, and some manage the company. But they all have one thing in common -- they do not own the business, they work for others who do. Entrepreneurs, in contrast, are both owners and employees. An entrepreneur is responsible for the success or failure of his or her business. Sell Something for More Than It Costs You to Buy (or Make) It Michelle loved fashionable clothes, but she lived in New Bedford, Massachusetts. The stores in New Bedford didn't always sell the latest fashions, and, when they did, they charged high prices. During an entrepreneurship class conducted by the National Foundation for Teaching Entrepreneurship, Inc. (NFTE), Michelle took a trip to Manhattan's wholesale clothing district. This visit gave Michelle her business idea. A wholesaler is a business that purchases products in bulk from the manufacturer and sells smaller quantities to retailers. Retailers buy small quantities from wholesalers and sell single items to customers. At each step along the road from the manufacturer to the customer, the price of the product increases. Michelle was surprised that wholesale prices were much lower than the prices of clothing in stores. Michelle knew there were, in her hometown, many young women like herself who would love to buy the latest fashions at reasonable prices. During her visit to the wholesale district, Michelle learned that all she needed to do to be able to buy

Package Dimensions: 9.0 x 7.3 x 1.4 inches

Languages: English

Reviews

Related Items

BACK TO TOP